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House Proposes Bill To Revise CPSIA
Vol. 818 
May 24, 2011

A House of Representatives subcommittee has proposed legislation that would amend the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008 (CPSIA). The bill, which was introduced by the Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Commerce, Manufacturing and Trade, would limit some of the lead limits allowable in children's toys, as well as reduce some of the testing and labeling rules in place in the current incarnation of the CPSIA law. The new proposal also aims to limit the scope of products governed by the CPSIA to items meant for children six and under (rather than the current age of 12), and which can be swallowed or put in kids' mouths.

"Today we are taking an important first step toward making the CPSIA the kind of truly landmark legislation it was originally intended to be," said committee chair Mary Bono Mack (R-CA). "When CPSIA was signed into law in 2008, it modernized and strengthened the Consumer Product Safety Commission in many different and meaningful ways. It was also the first significant reform of the CPSC in nearly two decades."

The House proposal aims to make the law reduce some of the testing burdens that have been placed on American businesses, while also ensuring consumers that the products they purchase are safe. "While CPSIA has many virtues, there are some unintended consequences of the law as well," said Mack. "Over the past four months, we have carefully reviewed the provisions which have turned out to be 'overreaching,' and today we are offering legislation to fix them. Admittedly, this is a careful balancing act, but even the Consumer Product Safety Commission has recognized the problems with CPSIA and requested greater flexibility in implementing the new law."

The proposal has passed a subcommittee voice vote, and is now scheduled to be considered by the full Energy and Commerce Committee this week. To read the complete text of the bill, click here.

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